By Subject

By Editor

Tips for Managing Rice Seedling Diseases

Seedling diseases can prevail in any rice field. However, their likelihood can be reduced with proper management. Seed rots and seedling diseases are generally “complex” meaning there can be more than one causal agent in a field. In fields with seedling problems, pathogen structures such as mycelia may easily be detected on the collar of

Continue reading Tips for Managing Rice Seedling Diseases

Pop up fertilizers: What you need to know

Pop up fertilizers are commonly used in some corn growing areas in the country.  The practice consists of applying a few pounds of nutrients with the seed at planting.  Planters are retrofitted with commercially available attachments that accurately deliver the desired volume of liquid fertilizer.  This practice should not be confused with “starter fertilizers” which

Continue reading Pop up fertilizers: What you need to know

Managing bacterial panicle blight: Research gives helpful clues

“Be proactive” – this is the best approach to beat the unexpected effects of sporadic diseases such as bacterial panicle blight (BPB) of rice.  Looking back, the rice yield and quality losses we had in 2010 and 2011 were enormous.  Having most of the conventional varieties still susceptible to BPB and with no chemical options

Continue reading Managing bacterial panicle blight: Research gives helpful clues

Plan your field size to effectively manage autumn decline or straighthead

“Drain and dry” is the recommended protective or rescue strategy to manage these two abiotic phenomena in rice.  Historically, straighthead disorder (Picture 1) has been associated with old cotton fields where arsenic pesticides were once used.  Although arsenic produces straighthead symptoms, it may not be the only cause.  Straighthead is a severe abnormality that may

Continue reading Plan your field size to effectively manage autumn decline or straighthead

Plan ahead to make profitable decisions about rice disease management

I hear some saying that the crop season in 2014 will be a “normal” one following such a severe winter.  Although I did not like the winter, my wish is that the cold temperature has effectively suppressed rice pathogens.  However, since we cannot be sure of this and the source of inoculum for all diseases

Continue reading Plan ahead to make profitable decisions about rice disease management

2013 Soybean performance results now available in the Soybean Update

Hundreds of soybean varieties are commercially available to growers in Arkansas. Varietal performance, including yield, varies according to location, environmental adaptability to soils, maturity, lodging, height, disease and nematode resistance, and herbicide and chloride sensitivity.  The information listed in these publications is largely derived from the University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture Soybean Performance Trials

Continue reading 2013 Soybean performance results now available in the Soybean Update

Dectes stem borer is making its presence known

We have been receiving numerous phone calls about Dectes stem borer in soybean this year.  We began seeing large numbers of adults in soybean fields as early as mid-June this year and populations appeared to peak in early- to mid-July.  Now we are beginning to receive reports of severe infestations in maturing Group IV and

Continue reading Dectes stem borer is making its presence known

Know your soybean diseases: Don’t be fooled by doppelgangers

Several soilborne soybean diseases occur in Arkansas that may look somewhat similar upon casual observation.  It is important, however, to accurately distinguish which is which because yield loss potential, as well as disease management and prevention may be radically different.  The following is a comparison of symptoms associated with southern soybean stem canker (SC), sudden

Continue reading Know your soybean diseases: Don’t be fooled by doppelgangers

Considerations for late season peanut diseases and determining when to dig

Though planting was delayed due to cool, wet weather in the spring and wet, cloudy conditions during pegging and pod formation were less than ideal for peanut production, overall, the crop is looking good to excellent.  This year half of the total acres (~11,000) were planted in high oleic runners (GA09B, FloRun 107 and FL

Continue reading Considerations for late season peanut diseases and determining when to dig

September brings hope for heat units and late cotton

Another week of mild weather aided in the accumulation of heat units throughout the state.  The seven day forecast also shows that temperatures should stay in the low to mid 90’s for highs, and low temperatures are predicted to stay in the upper 60 to lower 70 degree range.  Hopefully the warm weather will continue

Continue reading September brings hope for heat units and late cotton