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31
Aug
2018
Arkansas Rice Update 8-31-18
Author: Jarrod Hardke, Rice Extension Agronomist

Rice LogoArkansas Rice Update

Dr. Jarrod Hardke

August 31, 2018  No. 2018-27                www.uaex.edu/rice

Crop Update

“And then the witch doctor he gave me this advice, he said that ooo eee ooo ah ah ting tang walla walla bing bang.”  Hopefully you got a laugh out of that because the rest of the update isn’t very funny.

So far yield reports have continued to be very good from top to bottom in the state.  However, some variable yield reports are starting to flow in and the normal questions of “Why?” that go with them.  Some of these fields had Loyant applied to them.  To answer a common question of the past few days – no, we don’t know if there’s any impact there yet because there have been no comparisons cut yet.  We’ll continue looking at this closely and keep you posted.

The other bad news is the long-range forecast.  The 8-14 day outlook is for above normal temperature but also above average precipitation.  Considering we only have maybe 25% of the crop harvested (5% as of Monday) this is not the answer we’re looking for.  After three consecutive years of dry harvest windows we’ve been living on borrowed time.  Let’s hope we don’t catch up all at once.

Fig. 1.  A lot of rice in the state is ready when the conditions are willing.

 

Arkansas Rice Performance Trial Preliminary Results

We’re trying to get trails harvested just as growers are and finding trouble getting it dried down.  The preliminary results of the first ARPT harvested at RREC are listed in Table 1.

Table 1.  Preliminary data for Arkansas Rice Performance Trial planted at RREC, Stuttgart, 2018.

 

Narrow Brown Leaf Spot

Some calls have come in this week with possible potassium deficiencies.  Some of these definitely are, as I’ve been able to see them in the field for a while now.  However, Fig. 2, 3, and 4 are pictures of fields that actually have Narrow Brown Leaf Spot (Cercospera).  They’re still showing up in areas consistent with potassium deficiency, so that may still be in play.  Sooty mold is also present in these pictures.

Narrow brown leaf spot can come in very late and is usually not an issue for us.  However, these isolated areas can show reduced yields.  A fungicide application prior to heading would have likely prevented this, but we do not have a common or severe enough issue with this disease to target it specifically with fungicide applications.  The sprays need to be done preventatively, before you see the disease, to be effective.

Fig. 2.  Narrow brown leaf spot on rice flag leaves and grains.

Fig. 3.  Narrow brown leaf spot affecting an isolated area.

Fig. 4.  Narrow brown leaf spot on leaves.

 

 

 

New DD50 Program is Live!

Check out http://DD50.uaex.edu for the overhauled DD50 Rice Management Program.  We have tried to make this version extremely user friendly, but in doing so it is a little different than the old version.  If you run into any issue, please call or text me directly at 501-772-1714 or send emails to riceadvisor@uaex.edu.  It also works great on mobile phones and tablets.

 

 

Additional Information

Arkansas Rice Updates are published periodically to provide timely information and recommendations for rice production in Arkansas.  If you would like to be added to this email list, please send your request to rice@uaex.edu.

This information will also be posted to the Arkansas Row Crops blog (http://www.arkansas-crops.com/) where additional information from Extension specialists can be found.

More information on rice production, including access to all publications and reports, can be found at http://www.uaex.edu/rice.

Acknowledgements

We sincerely appreciate the support for this publication provided by the rice farmers of Arkansas and administered by the Arkansas Rice Research and Promotion Board.

The authors greatly appreciate the feedback and contributions of all growers, county agents, consultants, and rice industry stakeholders.


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