Find It Here
Twitter update
Subscribe

Subscribe to Post Updates from Arkansas Row Crops


 

RSS AgNews
Quick Links
Agricultural Programs
20
Apr
2018
Arkansas Rice Update 4-20-18
Author: Jarrod Hardke, Rice Extension Agronomist

Rice LogoArkansas Rice Update

Dr. Jarrod Hardke

April 20, 2018  No. 2018-08                www.uaex.edu/rice

Crop Progress

Jerry Clower has a great joke about how “it coulda been worse.”  The short version of the joke is he had an aunt who, no matter what happened, said “it coulda been worse.”  They got tired of this and decided to play a trick on her, and told her that the devil had toted off her poor husband Jessie.  She said, “it coulda been worse.”  They asked her how in the world it could be worse.

She said, “the devil coulda made poor old Jessie tote him.”

So, our conditions haven’t been great, but they coulda been worse.  NASS says we had 27% of the rice planted on Monday, but my traveling had me thinking around 40% at that time.  I expect a major jump to at least 60% planted in the coming report on this Monday.  That may still be shorting it as much of the northeast will be 75-90% planted by Saturday ahead of the rains.  However, this week represents the first real planting run for most of the Grand Prairie and the southeast have had their slowdowns.

Rice emergence has been equally slow with the cool conditions with only 3% emerged compared to 21% last year and 8% for the 5-year average.  It was reported that the first two weeks of April had the coldest average low temperature on record at Little Rock (40.9 degrees).

Fig. 1.  AR Rice Planting Progress 2007-2018.

 

Crop Outlook

In a “normal” year, I probably wouldn’t go so far as to say we have a favorable forecast coming up, but this isn’t a normal year.  Based on what we’ve been through so far this year, next week is a favorable forecast.  After the rain on Sunday it appears we have a week of upper 60s to low 70s which is the best forecast we’ve had all year.  Believe it or not, after the wind and sun of the past couple of days, some will need the rain this weekend to keep planting.

Certainly, we’re in mid to late April so there’s no time like the present to plant whatever rice you’re going to the best you’re able to do it.  For those with rice in the ground, you’re going to have to give it time with these conditions.  Emergence and stand establishment will be slow, but most will make it to a good stand and we’ll get off and running.  However, there will certainly be some fields with weak stands that have replant concerns.  If the cool, wet conditions persist there is always the risk of seedling disease issues weakening otherwise well-established stands.  More below on replant considerations.

Fig. 2.  Slow emerging, injured rice related to cool conditions.

 

Replanting Concerns

We currently recommend keeping stands of 5 plants per ft2 for varieties and stands of 3 plants per ft2 for hybrids.  Tables 1 and 2 show data from Pine Tree last year looking at sub-optimum stands.  Explanations of the tables and what columns mean are below each table.  The take-home message is that the net returns support current recommendations.

For LaKast, if no replant cost is incurred, only yield loss, it is only more profitable to replant if stand is less than 5 plants/ft2.  If stand is greater than 5 plants/ft2, a more profitable crop could not be grown if there were any additional costs associated with replanting.

For XP753, if no replant cost is incurred, only yield loss, it is only more profitable to replant if stand is less than 3 plants/ft2.  If stand is greater than 3 plants/ft2, a more profitable crop could not be grown if there were any additional costs associated with replanting.

Results from Stuttgart and Keiser trials (not shown) were similar.  Net return calculations include average costs for all inputs including seed, fertilizer, chemical, application, machinery and irrigation, but do not include rent payments.

Table 1.  LaKast replant study at Pine Tree Research Station, Net Return by average plant stand and replant cost, 2017.

* Net return based on grain yield & milling at current prices.

N-11% Yield based on yield loss of 11% planting May 1 compared to April 1.  NR-11% -$25 based on yield loss and $25 additional replant cost.  NR-11%-$50 based on yield loss and $50 additional replant cost.

Table 2.  RT XP753 replant study at Pine Tree Research Station, Net Return by average plant stand and replant cost, 2017.

* Net return based on grain yield & milling at current prices.

NR-11% Yield based on yield loss of 11% planting May 1 compared to April 1.  NR-11% -$25 based on yield loss and $25 additional replant cost.  NR-11%-$50 based on yield loss and $50 additional replant cost.

 

DD50 Program Being Updated

With rice emerging it’s time to mention the DD50 Rice Management Program.  Next week we will be going live with the completely revamped DD50 program.  A notice will be sent out that it is live and ready for fields to be entered.  Division of Agriculture staff, with support from the Arkansas Rice Research and Promotion Board, have made major improvements to the program in its function and appearance on both desktop and mobile devices, including adding in more localized weather data to further improve the information growers receive from the program.  As always, we welcome your feedback on this for additional improvements in the future.

 

Additional Information

Arkansas Rice Updates are published periodically to provide timely information and recommendations for rice production in Arkansas.  If you would like to be added to this email list, please send your request to rice@uaex.edu.

This information will also be posted to the Arkansas Row Crops blog (http://www.arkansas-crops.com/) where additional information from Extension specialists can be found.

More information on rice production, including access to all publications and reports, can be found at http://www.uaex.edu/rice.

Acknowledgements

We sincerely appreciate the support for this publication provided by the rice farmers of Arkansas and administered by the Arkansas Rice Research and Promotion Board.

The authors greatly appreciate the feedback and contributions of all growers, county agents, consultants, and rice industry stakeholders.


Save pagePDF pageEmail pagePrint page
«
»