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17
Jun
2015
Arkansas Peanut Crop Update: Acres Planted and Checking for Nodulation
Author: Travis Faske, Extension Plant Pathologist

The 2015 peanut crop has been planted and the total acres are estimated at 17,500, which is much higher than earlier estimates and ~1,000 acres less than the 2013 crop.  This year more peanuts were planted in Mississippi Co.; however, the total acres per county has yet to be finalized.  Again this year, the two most popular cultivars were Georgia-09B and Georgia-06G.  Overall, the crop is good to excellent, and a few fields are beginning to bloom (Fig 1 & 2).

Figure 1.  Runner peanut field near Pocahontas, AR

Figure 1. Runner peanut field near Pocahontas, AR

Peanut2

Figure 2. Runner peanut plants beginning to bloom that were planted in April, 2015. Note: Spots on leaves are due to herbicide injury not disease.

Producers should be checking their crop for adequate nodulation.  Nodulation is necessary to provide nitrogen to the plant–a good count per plant is 25 nodules.  In fields with well drained, course textured soil, nodulation will be visible 35-40 days after planting (DAP), whereas those marginal fields with shallow soils that retain more moisture may need a little more time (40-45 DAP).  To inspect roots, carefully dig the entire root system and look for round nodules on the tap root or lateral roots.  Nitrogen deficiency is rarely detected by yellow foliage until pegging, which is too late to add additional nitrogen if nodulation is insufficient for adequate production.  Of the fields that have been inspected, peanut roots had sufficient nodulation (Fig. 3).

Fig. 3.  Peanut roots with nodules produced by Bradyrhizobium bacteria, which convert nitrogen gas (N2) to a form of nitrogen that can be used by peanut plants.

Figure 3. Peanut roots with nodules produced by Bradyrhizobium bacteria, which convert nitrogen gas (N2) to a form of nitrogen that can be used by peanut plants.

 


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