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04
Apr
2014
Arkansas Rice Update 4-4-14
Author: Jarrod Hardke, Rice Extension Agronomist

April 4, 2014                                 No. 2014-4

Dr. Jarrod Hardke, Dr. Rick Norman, Dr. Bob Scott, and Scott Stiles

Planting Progress

I’m guessing around 5% of rice is in the ground to date.  Most of it is isolated in places that have lucked into dry conditions.  A number of fields went in early this week ahead of last night’s rain.  We’ll see how we can proceed with scattered rain chances Sunday through Tuesday.

The first planting date study that was drilled last Wednesday (3/26) was just germinating yesterday.  Warmer soil conditions (finally) should have fields already planted doing the same.  If you have rice in the ground I hope you also got your herbicide out so these rains could get them activated.

We’re still looking at cooler than normal conditions coming up just like we’ve been dealing with.  This is the first time since 2002 that we made it through March without hitting 80 for a high temp (based on Little Rock data).

We’re still in good shape for now, but we may look up and be in late April before we know it.  I think we could all stand to fall into a pattern of occasional small rains giving us time to plant and then get some moisture to germinate the seed and activate herbicides then plant some more.  That’s what I’m hoping for anyway.

Picture 1.  Rice planted earlier this week.

Prospective Plantings Report

The 2014 USDA Prospective Plantings Report was released on Monday, March 31.  Table 1 contains the prospective plantings for the U.S. while Table 2 contains estimates for Arkansas only.

Major takeaways from the U.S. estimate are slight reductions in corn, wheat, and medium-grain rice acres compared to 2013; and a large drop in grain sorghum acreage is also expected.

In Arkansas, the major trends are for significant reductions in corn and wheat acres while other crops are expected to increase.  Rice is expected to increase by the greatest amount and reach acreage levels not seen since 2010.

Table 1.  2014 U.S. Planted Acreage Estimates (million acres), March 31, 2014.

Crop

2013

2014

% Change

Corn

95.37

91.69

-4%

Soybean

76.53

81.49

6%

Wheat

43.09

42.01

-3%

Cotton

10.41

11.10

7%

Rice – All

2.49

2.88

16%

    Long

1.78

2.23

25%

    Medium

0.66

0.62

-6%

Grain Sorghum

8.06

6.68

-17%

Table 2.  2014 Arkansas Planted Acreage Estimates (total acres), March 31, 2014.

Crop

2013

2014

% Change

Corn

880,000

600,000

-32%

Soybean

3,260,000

3,350,000

3%

Wheat

680,000

440,000

-35%

Cotton

310,000

340,000

10%

Rice – All

1,076,000

1,521,000

41%

    Long

955,000

1,350,000

41%

    Medium

120,000

170,000

42%

G. Sorghum

130,000

140,000

8%

For more detail on the prospective plantings report:

http://www.arkansas-crops.com/2014/03/31/prospective-plantings-report/

Urea Stabilizers

The use of urea stabilizer products has become a standard recommendation in recent years.  Products containing the urea stabilizer NBPT that have been evaluated and recommended after University testing include:  Arborite, Agrotain, Factor, and N-FIXX.

Situation #1:

Time to flood is greater than 2 days on a silt loam field or greater than 7 days on a clay field.

Urea treated with NBPT or ammonium sulfate should be used as ammonia volatilization could result in a 20 bushel or greater yield loss.

Situation #2:

Weather prevents the application of urea onto dry soil and must instead be applied to muddy soil.

Urea treated with NBPT or ammonium sulfate should again be used or a 20 bushel or greater yield loss could occur.

Current available University research exists only for those products mentioned.  Other commercial products either have not been evaluated, are in the process of being evaluated, or are not currently recommended.

Sharpen Herbicide in Rice

Sharpen herbicide is the only new product registered for use in rice in 2014.  For some time it has been labeled pre-plant up to prior to emergence.  The rate is 2.0 oz product per acre.  You should add an MSO + AMS to the burndown treatment.  It will provide great control of horseweed and other broadleaf weeds including pigweed and morningglory.  This use has been labeled previously.

Sharpen can now also be applied post-emergence in rice after rice reaches the two leaf stage.  After application you can expect a lot of burning.  I would not tank mix with other contact burning type herbicides.  The post-emergence rate for Sharpen is 1.0 oz/acre and you should only add Crop Oil Concentrate at 1%.  Applied POST in rice, Sharpen has a similar spectrum of weed control to Aim plus some residual of pigweed and other broadleaf weeds.

Consult the label and the MP-44 at www.uaex.edu for more information.

Are You Maximizing Control with your Herbicide Application?

http://www.arkansas-crops.com/2014/04/01/maximizing-herbicide-application/

Managing Bacterial Panicle Blight: Research Gives Helpful Clues

http://www.arkansas-crops.com/2014/04/02/managing-bacterial-research/

DD50 Enrollment

Some changes have been made to the online DD50 Program this year.  Hopefully these and future changes will continue to make the program easier and more efficient to use.  If you have any questions, or suggestions for improving the program, please let us know.  You can access the online program here: http://dd50.uaex.edu/.

Additional Information

Arkansas Rice Updates are published periodically to provide timely information and recommendations for rice production in Arkansas.  If you would like to be added to this email list, please send your request to jhardke@uaex.edu.

This information will also be posted to the Arkansas Row Crops where additional information from Extension specialists can be found.  Please visit the blog at http://www.arkansas-crops.com/

Acknowledgements

We sincerely appreciate the support provided by the Arkansas Rice Research and Promotion Board for this publication.

The authors greatly appreciate the feedback and contributions of all growers, county agents, consultants, and rice industry stakeholders.


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