Find It Here
Twitter update
Subscribe

Subscribe to Post Updates from Arkansas Row Crops


 

RSS AgNews
Quick Links
Agricultural Programs
14
Mar
2014
Be aware of your rice varieties’ reaction to disease
Author: Yeshi Wamishe, Extension Rice Plant Pathologist

It is important to know the disease susceptibility levels of your rice varieties you are considering to grow and how to manage them accordingly.  I am getting questions on disease resistance levels for varieties that have not been reported in the “Disease Reaction Table of 2013” (Table 1).  If a rating is lacking in the table, it does not mean the variety is resistant to the respective disease.  Instead, it simply means we have not seen disease in the past few years.

I also received a few questions on the new Louisiana medium-grain rice variety, Caffey.  With the latest projection that medium-grain rice prices may increase due to the drought in California, Arkansas producers could grow more medium-grain rice (Delta Farm Press). We have not seen blast or straighthead on Caffey in Arkansas.  According on Dr. Don Groth of LSU, Caffey has better resistance to blast than Jupiter.  With that said, Caffey still needs a recommended flood depth to be maintained.  If you have to choose between the two varieties on sandy soils, Caffey would be a better choice.  Caffey is moderately susceptible to “Straighthead” so, you still need to “drain and dry” as DD50 program recommends, particularly if your field has a history of this phenomenon.  Remember Clearfield 261, another medium-grain, is very susceptible to both blast and bacterial panicle blight.  To read more on medium-grain rice go to Medium-grain rice considerations by Jarrod Hardke.

Table 1. Rice variety disease reaction (2013)

CultivarSheath BlightBlast Straight HeadBacterial Panicle BlightNarrow Brown Leaf SpotStem RotKernel SmutFalse SmutLodgingBlack Sheath RotSheath Spot
AntonioSSMSSSMSMS
AREX1801SSMSSSSSSMSMSS
ARIZE 1003MSMR/MSSVS
BengalMSSVSVSSVSMSMSMRMR
CaffeyMSSRMS
CatahoulaVSRMSSMRSSSMRS
CheniereSVSVSVSSSSSMRMS
CL111VSMSSVSVSVSSSMSS
CL131VSMSVSVSVSVSSSMRS
CL142RMSSMSSSSSSSS
CL181ARVSMSMSVSSVSSSMRVS
CL151SVSVSVSSVSSSMRS
CL152SVSSSRVSS
CL162VSVSVSRSSS
CL261MSVSSVSSVSMSSMSMS
CocodrieSSVSSSVSSSMRS
ColoradoSVSSS
Della-2
FrancisMSVSMRVSSSVSSMSS
JazzmanMSSSMSSSMSSMSMS
Jazzman-2VSSVSMRSS
JesSRVSSRVSMSMSSMR
JupiterSSSMRMSVSMSMSMSMR
MermentauSSVSMSSSMS
NeptuneMSMSVSVSMSVSMSMSMRMR
RexSSSSMSSSSMRS
Roy JMSSSSMRSVSSMRMS
RT CL XL729MSRMSMRMSSMSSSS
RT CL XL745SRRMRMSSMSSSSS
RT CL XP756MSSS
RT XL723MSRSMRMSSMSSMSS
RT XP 753MSMRMSSS
RT XP 754MSSSS
TaggartMSMSRMSMSSSSMSMS
TempletonMSRSMSSMSSSMSMS
WellsSSSSSVSSSMSMS

Reaction: R = Resistant; MR = Moderately Resistant; MS = Moderately Susceptible; S = Susceptible; VS = Very Susceptible. Reactions were determined based on historical and recent observations from test plots and in grower fields across Arkansas. In general, these reactions would be expected under conditions that favor severe disease development including excessive nitrogen rates (most diseases) or low flood depth (blast).
Table prepared by Y. Wamishe, Assistant Professor/Extension Plant Pathologist and R.D. Cartwright, Associate Director – Ag and Natural Resources


Save pagePDF pageEmail pagePrint page
«
»