By Subject

By Editor

Arkansas Rice Update 8-16-13

August 16, 2013                          No. 2013-21

Dr. Jarrod Hardke, Dr. Gus Lorenz, and Dr. Yeshi Wamishe

Crop Progress

We’re definitely not having a heat wave.  It’s tough to make crop progress when it’s so cool at night you can turn the A/C off.

So what does the cool weather mean for the rice crop?  Direct impact – not necessarily a lot.  Yes, it will slow the crop down while it’s cool, but it shouldn’t really hurt anything.  The real loss with this cool spell is time.  We need heat to keep things moving on a later crop that’s getting later.

Indirect impact is the real kicker.  Cool, wet, cloudy weather just before and after heading is not beneficial to grain fill.  To what extent will it impact it?  Great question, fuzzy answer.  How wet, how cool, how cloudy, it all depends.  Hope for the best, prepare for the worst.

On the positive side of things, early fields were starting to be drained last week with more following this week.  Starting to pick up steam in that department.  The earliest date I’ve heard thrown out for trying to get a combine in the field is about Aug. 21.  While there are many variables involved in drain timing, the general recommendation is to drain 25 days after 50% heading for long-grains and 30 days after 50% heading for medium-grains.  How quickly you can drain the field, soil type, and weather all play significant roles in deciding when to drain.

Research on silt loam soils supports the 25 day rule.  Drain earlier than 21 days and you definitely run the risk of giving up significant yield.  I know we badly want to speed things up right now, but let’s not give yield away.  If Mother Nature wants to take it from us, she will, but let’s not do the damage ourselves.

Is 98% of the crop actually headed like the DD50 numbers say?  Not from what I’m seeing.  The date to 20% moisture has moved up significantly in the past week though, with half of the crop supposed to reach that point before September.  Probably still a little off, but a promising movement regardless.

Tables – Percent of rice acres to reach growth stages during listed weeks of 2013 according to current DD50 enrollment.

Table 1.  50% heading.

50% Heading Date

Percent

50%   Headed

98%

Aug   16-22

0%

Aug   23-29

2%

Table 2.  20% grain moisture.

Harvest Date

Percent

Aug   3-9

0%

Aug   10-16

1%

Aug   17-23

22%

Aug   24-30

36%

Aug   31 – Sept 6

26%

Sept   7-13

9%

Sept   14-20

4%

Sept   21-27

0%

Sept   8 – Oct 4

2%

First FSA Rice Acreage Report of 2013 Released Today

Table 3 shows a summary of the rice acreage information released in the report.  Rice acres are listed by county – long-grain, medium-grain, and total county acreage.

Total rice acreage for the state is reported at 971,631.  Of that, 871,666 (90%) is long-grain and 99,880 (10%) is medium-grain.  This is a significant reduction from previous USDA estimates (March: 1.226 million acres, August:  1.055 million acres).  The last time Arkansas planted fewer than 1 million acres of rice was 1983 (915,000 acres).

Monthly FSA acreage updates will be released for the remainder of the year with final numbers released in January.  Final enrollment is not due until mid-September so these numbers may still be subject to change.

Table 3.  2013 FSA rice acres.

County

Long

Med.

Total

ARKANSAS

65,367

5,461

70,828

ASHLEY

4,533

0

4,533

CHICOT

24,586

0

24,586

CLAY

58,599

6,006

64,606

CONWAY

1,704

0

1,704

CRAIGHEAD

50,684

6,276

56,960

CRITTNDEN

10,240

2,039

12,280

CROSS

60,643

4,673

65,315

DESHA

9,283

229

9,513

DREW

7,116

0

7,116

FAULKNER

1,815

0

1,815

GREENE

58,846

2,722

61,568

INDEPNDCE

7,554

201

7,755

JACKSON

36,620

15,563

52,183

JEFFERSON

54,741

697

55,438

LAFAYETTE

3,164

0

3,164

LAWRENCE

71,649

11,707

83,356

LEE

6,651

0

6,651

LINCOLN

11,785

193

11,978

LONOKE

64,324

2,575

66,899

MISSISSIP

18,479

295

18,775

MONROE

35,084

2,029

37,113

PHILLIPS

17,946

231

18,177

POINSETT

36,563

24,851

61,414

PRAIRIE

42,630

4,109

46,739

PULASKI

3,371

0

3,371

RANDOLPH

23,674

5,386

29,060

SAINT FRA

24,187

2,290

26,477

WHITE

8,950

896

9,847

WOODRUFF

45,264

1,410

46,673

OTHERS

5,613

40

5,653

TOTAL

871,666

99,880

971,631

Out Standing in Your Rice Field

Rice Stink Bug

Keep an eye out for rice stink bug in later planted fields.  Numbers have fallen off from what they were when the first rice began to head, but we’re beginning to pick up nymphs pointing toward a new batch ready to invade late-planted fields.  It may have gotten better for now, but it is set up to get worse.

Picture 1.  Rice stink bug nymphs hatching.2013-21 Picture 1

For the Birds

Not that we needed another problem, but we got one.  A number of complaints have been received about large numbers of blackbirds feeding on headed rice.  In some hotspots, we’ve seen as much as 30% kernel loss.  No real cure for the problem except trying to keep them run off – easier said than done.  Just be on the lookout, especially near tree lines, but we have seen them attacking fields far away from tree lines as well.

Picture 2.  Bird damage to headed rice.2013-21 Picture 2

Disease Notes

Sheath blight:  There are several reports of sheath blight due to the recent rain and associated favorable environmental conditions for the disease development.  You need to continue scouting to make sure the upper three leaves are clean.  Sheath blight can move very fast up the canopy and across the field in a few days.  We may consider applying lower rates of Quadris even after heading to protect particularly the flag leaf and the head.  However, the threshold level and the pre-harvest interval (PHI) are important aspects to remember before you decide to spray fungicide this late.

Picture 3.  Sheath blight moves up the canopy through mycelial growth in plant tissue and spreads to neighboring plants through infected tissue contact.2013-21 Picture 3

Bacterial panicle blight (BPB):  About two weeks back we reported BPB in experimental plots planted with inoculated seeds at Stuttgart.  That same week, BPB was also seen in medium grain non-inoculated breeder’s plots.

In 2013, we got the first report of BPB in commercial fields of Jazzman yesterday (8/15) in Lee County.  A 15-acre field of Jazzman planted on April 23rd and closer to a creek and trees shows more BPB than a 180-acre field across from it planted on April 18.  To date, we do not have clear evidence on the role of dew period on BPB disease severity or incidence.  Planting dates are not far enough apart to explain the difference in BPB severity in this case.  Both fields were planted with soybean last year.  However, BPB has not been expected to be severe this year due to the lower temperatures.  One question we have started asking is “are the bacteria causing BPB adapting to a wider range of temperature?”  Although there is nothing you can do about BPB at the moment, we would like you to let us know about it.  Any information about this disease is useful to our effort to looking for management options.

Picture 4.  BPB in Jazzman rice field closer to a creek and trees (see the dew).2013-21 Picture 4

Growth of opportunistic fungi on the surfaces of empty glumes (A), bird damage (B), and blank kernels due to environmental factors (C) may be confused with bacterial panicle blight.  For correct identification of BPB go to:  http://www.arkansas-crops.com/2011/12/19/downloadable-quick-id-guide-for-panicle-blight-in-rice/.2013-21 ABC

Blast:  We saw very little collar blast found in a field of CL261 that was reported as having leaf blast a few weeks ago.  The field has received one application of Quadris early in the season and an additional spray with Stratego (19 fl oz/acre) at early heading.  Leaf blast was reported from Randolph County on CL152.

Picture 5.  Collar blast (left) on CL261 in Monroe Co. and leaf blast (right) on CL152 in Randolph Co.2013-21 Picture 5

Need Help with DD50 Enrollment?  Call or E-mail Me or Your Local County Extension Agent

If you prefer to enter them yourself, please visit http://dd50.uaex.edu/dd50Logon.asp.

Additional Information

Arkansas Rice Updates are published periodically to provide timely information and recommendations for rice production in Arkansas.  If you would like to be added to this email list, please send your request to jhardke@uaex.edu.

This information will also be posted to the Arkansas Row Crops where additional information from Extension specialists can be found.  Please visit the blog at http://www.arkansas-crops.com/

Acknowledgements

We sincerely appreciate the support provided by the Arkansas Rice Research and Promotion Board for this publication.

The authors greatly appreciate the feedback and contributions of all growers, county agents, consultants, and rice industry stakeholders.


Comments are closed.