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16
May
2013
Arkansas rice update – May 16, 2013
Author: Jarrod Hardke, Rice Extension Agronomist

May 16, 2013                                No. 2013-8

Dr. Jarrod Hardke Dr. Bob Scott, and Dr. Yeshi Wamishe

Planting Forecast

This has been a week for progress up and down the state.  The last rice planting progress estimate came in at 60% on Monday, but I have a strong feeling that we’ll be in the 80% range by the time the next estimate is released.  With rainfall scattered throughout the state as I write this and more on the way tonight and tomorrow, I hope you’ve made enough progress to now be in need of a shower.

Are we nearing the end?  Well, there will be rainfall through tomorrow and more is forecast for Tuesday.  At that point we’ll find ourselves in late May – probably a good time to start making a judgment call to stick with rice or go to soybeans.  Don’t be hardheaded; make the best financial choice regardless of crop.  I’d like for you to be able to plant more rice this year, but I’d rather you plant something else if it keeps you farming another year.  Then you can plant some more rice.

Can we still make profitable rice planting in late May?  I believe that we can.  We are well behind on heat units and history says we’ll make them up during the growing season (Table 1).  Is there any assurance of that?  I’m afraid I’m not properly insured to guarantee it.

Cultivar Selection:  Match Game

If you decide to stick with rice, don’t worry so much about the maturity of the cultivar – focus on the disease package you need.

Concerned about bacterial panicle blight?  Plant a hybrid or Jupiter.  No other cultivars offer an effective level of resistance.

History of blast problems?  If you cannot manage an adequate flood and apply a fungicide in a timely manner, then plant a hybrid so that it’s not an issue.

Straighthead an issue?  Taggart, Francis, and CLXL745 are reasonable options.

Lodging?  Roy J is your best bet, but Taggart and Rex fair pretty well also, to name a couple.

If you want to go for the big boom, I understand.  Just make sure you have enough safer choices planted to cover your bottom line and prevent a bust year.

If you’re still in doubt, “dance with the one that brung ya.”

Table 1.  DD50 units accumulated from March 16 to August 15 each year.

Year DD50 units Year DD50 units

1983

2,953

1998

3,657

1984

3,126

1999

3,454

1985

3,366

2000

3,665

1986

3,463

2001

3,454

1987

3,507

2002

3,401

1988

3,305

2003

3,303

1989

3,091

2004

3,249

1990

3,068

2005

3,345

1991

3,556

2006

3,500

1992

3,134

2007

3,522

1993

3,192

2008

3,317

1994

3,329

2009

3,249

1995

3,419

2010

3,670

1996

3,303

2011

3,538

1997

3,080

2012

3,773

 

Warm Days & More DD50 Units

Could we be any further behind on DD50 units?  1993 was the last time we accumulated as few heat units from March 16 to May 13 as we have this year (1993 = 581, 2013 = 506).  We need heat units to make a crop, and history says they should be on their way.  In 1993, we ended up with a total of 3,192 DD50 units from March 16 to August 15, despite starting out slow.  The thirty-year average for the same period is 3,366.  Do I expect some of the top-end yields seen from early-planted rice in 2010 and 2012?  No, but I hope improved quality makes up for any yield reduction we see.

Section 18 Approved for Bird Repellent

AV-1011 Bird Repellent for rice seed has received an emergency exemption for use in Arkansas until June 15, 2013.  This product has shown to be effective at preventing bird depredation of rice seed.  Rice seed treated with AV-1011 is approved for use in drill, water, and broadcast systems.  Please contact your local seed dealer for more information about having your seed treated with this product.

Always read and follow label directions.

Picture 1.  Fast and furious planting early in the week in northeast AR.

Planting Rice in mid-May

Herbicide Issues

Remember to read labels carefully when making pre-emergence burndown applications prior to planting rice.  Herbicide plant-back restrictions are on the label for a reason and should be followed.  If you press the issue, you could pay for it later by further delaying your rice crop.

Remember to be aware of fields planted around yours when herbicide applications are being made.  Try your best to avoid affecting your neighbor’s crop and hopefully he’ll do the same for you.  “Flag the Technology” to help in this battle.

Picture 2.  Black River Relief relieving itself on this unsuspecting rice field.

Black River Relief Floods Rice Field

Diseases May Be a Concern in Late Planted Rice

Dr. Yeshi Wamishe provides guidance on diseases of late-planted rice in an article posted today.  For more information, please see the article on the Arkansas Row Crops blog here:

http://www.arkansas-crops.com/2013/05/16/diseases-may-be-a-concern-in-late-planted-rice/

DD50 Enrollment

Please remember to enroll your fields in the DD50 program this year.  Call or email your local county extension office and they can enter the fields for you.  You can also send them to me and I’ll see that they’re entered.  Or you can visit http://dd50.uaex.edu/dd50Logon.asp to enter them yourself.  Feel free to contact me with any questions or problems.

Additional Information

Arkansas Rice Updates are published periodically to provide timely information and recommendations for rice production in Arkansas.  If you would like to be added to this email list, please send your request to jhardke@uaex.edu.

This information will also be posted to the Arkansas Row Crops where additional information from Extension specialists can be found.  Please visit the blog at http://www.arkansas-crops.com/

Acknowledgements

We sincerely appreciate the support provided by the Arkansas Rice Research and Promotion Board for this publication.

The authors greatly appreciate the feedback and contributions of all growers, county agents, consultants, and rice industry stakeholders.


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