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03
May
2013
Arkansas Rice Update 5-3-13
Author: Jarrod Hardke, Rice Extension Agronomist

May 3, 2013                                  No. 2013-6

Dr. Jarrod Hardke and Dr. Yeshi Wamishe

Planting Forecast

Rain is a four-letter word these days, if you catch my drift.  Quite frankly I’m getting tired of writing it.  I don’t want to talk too bad about it or it might up and disappear when we really need it.  So instead I’ll hope that we start saving some for later.

It’s supposed to rain (a lot) and get nice and chilly.  Not just garden-variety chilly, but record-low chilly.  Friday is looking like rain most of the day – high of 52, low of 38.  Saturday will have a balmy high of 60 with rain slacking off.

On a lighter note, if we can avoid too much rain over the next couple of days, the next significant rain chance is not until Thursday of next week.  If we could find a way into a pattern of “a little rain, a few days of work, a little rain, a few days of work…” then we could really get rolling.

Surveying rice levees

USDA planting progress report on Monday indicated that 40% of rice in the state has been planted.  With some progress being made this week, we should be in the 45-50% planted range for the next report.  We’re still doing ok.  I think to be a successful farmer you need to be a long-distance runner with a short memory, but sometimes it’s ok to look back to gain some perspective.  Have a look at Table 1 to see where our planting progress has been at this point in the season over the past 30 years.

While it’s not often that we get delayed this much, it has happened and we still had plenty of success in those years.  As a matter of fact, lengthen those short memories just a little bit and you’ll discover that we were delayed a lot like this way, way back in 2011.

Table 1.  First Week of May Planting Progress and Eventual State Average Yield.

Year

% Planted

Avg. Yield

1981

67

100

1982

17

95

1983

14

95

1984

38

102

1985

39

116

1986

66

118

1987

77

117

1988

45

119

1989

71

124

1990

12

111

1991

22

117

1992

87

122

1993

15

112

1994

65

127

1995

70

121

1996

61

137

1997

60

126

1998

65

129

1999

50

131

2000

71

136

2001

91

141

2002

81

143

2003

87

146

2004

77

155

2005

76

148

2006

94

152

2007

81

161

2008

55

148

2009

63

151

2010

90

144

2011

45

150

2012

97

166

2013

50?

???

Still More On Aerial Broadcasting and Water-Seeding Treated Rice?

CruiserMaxx Rice-treated seed cannot be aerially broadcast or water-seeded.  Period.

The labels do not prohibit aerially broadcasting rice treated with the fungicides Apron XL, Maxim 4FS, Maxim XL, and Dynasty, or combinations of these.  However, this is not a practice recommended by Syngenta.

The labels also do not prohibit water-seeding rice treated with the fungicides Apron XL, Maxim 4FS, Maxim XL, and Dynasty, or combinations of these (only DRY seed; treated rice seed CANNOT be pre-soaked).  However, this is also not a practice recommended by Syngenta.

Please remember that broadcasting treated rice seed, either onto dry ground or into standing water, could lead to a significant loss of the treatment and it would be unwise to expect or depend on the full effect of that seed treatment.  In other words – don’t skimp on the seeding rate if you choose to do this because it is possible you will lose the fungicide before it has a chance to work for you.

Final Reminder:  Do not pre-soak treated rice seed of any kind.

Potassium Fertilizer for Rice General Health

While excessive nitrogen fertilization is sometimes blamed for higher incidence and severity of certain rice diseases, adequate potassium (K) fertilization is praised for improving general crop health.  Brown spot disease of rice (Picture 3) is one of the indicators that the crop is under some sort of stress, likely potassium deficiency.  Rice that is potassium deficient is usually shorter and may not have a “lush green” appearance after nitrogen fertilizer application.  When you walk in rice fields low in potassium, you get a feeling that something is not right with the crop.

Picture 3.  Brown spot disease of rice.

Brown spot disease of rice

Stem rot of rice (Picture 4) is the other disease that serves as an indicator of potassium deficiency.  We also think low potassium in soil may play a role in increasing the severity of rice bacterial panicle blight.  Past research has indicated that Cercospora leaf spot, sheath blight, sheath rot, and blast may be observed more frequently in fields with excessive nitrogen fertilization.

Picture 4.  Stem rot disease of rice.

Stem rot disease of rice

Other opportunistic fungi also may take advantage and attack “the potassium hungry crop”.  We can literally say that the “immune system” of the crop is compromised when the crop is low in potassium.  Low potassium affects canopy photosynthesis – directly affecting crop growth.  Potassium is important throughout the crop life cycle to increase the grain yield potential of your crop.

Plants take up potassium in large amounts to accomplish several physiological activities important for good plant growth and health.  Nutrient deficiencies need to be corrected early in the season – don’t wait until after the damage is done.

For more information on potassium requirements and fertilization of rice, please visit:

http://www.arkansas-crops.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/FSA-2165.pdf.

Additional Information

Arkansas Rice Updates are published periodically to provide timely information and recommendations for rice production in Arkansas.  If you would like to be added to this email list, please send your request to jhardke@uaex.edu.

This information will also be posted to the Arkansas Row Crops where additional information from Extension specialists can be found.  Please visit the blog at http://www.arkansas-crops.com/

Acknowledgements

We sincerely appreciate the support provided by the Arkansas Rice Research and Promotion Board for this publication.

The authors greatly appreciate the feedback and contributions of all growers, county agents, consultants, and rice industry stakeholders.


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